Psychology of Social Integration [NTA-NET (Based on NTA-UGC) Psychology (Paper-II)]: Questions 5 - 9 of 63

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Question number: 5

» Psychology of Social Integration » Social Integration

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Question

Stanley Milgram’s experiment in which a “teacher” gave shocks to a “learner” was designed to test the limits of

Choices

Choice (4)Response

a.

expert power.

b.

conformity to a majority.

c.

obedience.

d.

coercive power.

Question number: 6

» Psychology of Social Integration » Social Integration

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Milgram’s shock study showed people to be surprisingly

Choices

Choice (4)Response

a.

sexist.

b.

rebellious.

c.

obedient.

d.

faithful.

Question number: 7

» Psychology of Social Integration » Social Integration

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The most effective method of predicting that a mental patient will commit an act of violence is by

Choices

Choice (4)Response

a.

projective methods.

b.

There is no effective method.

c.

psychological interviews.

d.

psychiatric interviews.

Question number: 8

» Psychology of Social Integration » Social Integration

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The ________ hypothesis states that frustration tends to lead to aggression.

Choices

Choice (4)Response

a.

cognitive dissonance

b.

frustration-aggression

c.

social learning

d.

social loafing

Question number: 9

» Psychology of Social Integration » Social Integration

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In his classic studies of conformity, Asch demonstrated that

Choices

Choice (4)Response

a.

increased unanimity greatly increases pressure to conform.

b.

a majority of one produces about as much conformity as a majority of eight.

c.

lack of unanimity greatly reduces the pressure to conform.

d.

obedience to authority was determined by the authority’s perceived referent power.

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