NTA-NET (Based on NTA-UGC) Psychology (Paper-II): Questions 38 - 42 of 6630

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Question 38

Question

MCQ▾

The perception of hue depends primarily on

Choices

Choice (4)Response

a.

wavelength

b.

intensity of saturation

c.

firing frequency of nerves

d.

optic chiasm

Question 39

Question

MCQ▾

Humans see better at night by looking at objects from the side then by looking straight at objects. This is explained by

Choices

Choice (4)Response

a.

lateral geniculate activity

b.

the way rods are distributed on the retina

c.

the opponent-process theory

d.

the crossing of the optic nerves in the neural pathway

Question 40

Question

MCQ▾

The primary lesson of the Zimbardo prison study was

Choices

Choice (4)Response

a.

to demonstrate that certain personality types should not be in positions of authority

b.

that people՚s behavior depends largely on the roles they are asked to play

c.

that students are very suggestible and are not good research subjects

d.

how quickly people are corrupted by power

Question 41

Question

MCQ▾

Long-term use of a dopamine-blocking neuroleptic would probably improve the condition of

Choices

Choice (4)Response

a.

Schizophrenia

b.

Parkinson՚s disease

c.

tardive dyskinesia

d.

Wernicke՚s syndrome

Question 42

Question

MCQ▾

According to the true score theory, an individual՚s score on a test of extraversion reflects a level of extraversion as defined by the test and that level is presumed to be

Choices

Choice (4)Response

a.

more than degree of error in the score

b.

only an estimate of the testtaker՚s true level of extraversion.

c.

the testtaker՚s “true” level of extraversion.

d.

greater than the degree of error inherent in the score.

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