Reading Comprehension-Moderately Difficult Passages (CBSE-NET (UGC) Paper-I): Questions 5 - 10 of 17

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Passage

Traditional Indian values must both be viewed from the angle of an individual and from that of a geographically delimited agglomeration of peoples or groups enjoying a common system of leadership which we call as “State”. Indian state’s special feature is peaceful, coexistence of social groups of various historical provenances which mutually adhere in geographical, economic and political sense, without ever assimilating to each other in social terms, in ways of thinking, or even in language. Modern Indian law will determine certain rules, especially in relation to the regime of the family, upon the basis of how the loin-cloth is tied, or how the turban is worn, for this may identify the litigants as members of a regional group, and therefore as participants in its traditional law, though their ancestors left the region three or four centuries earlier. The use of the word ‘State’ above must not mislead us. There was no such thing as a conflict between the individual and the State, atleast before foreign governments became established, just as there was no concept of state ‘sovereignty’ or of any church-and-state dichotomy.

Modem Indian ‘secularism’ has an admittedly peculiar feature: It requires the state to make a fair distribution of attention amongst all religions. These blessed aspects of India’s famed tolerance (Indian kings to rarely persecuted religious groups that the exceptions prove the rule) at once struck Portuguese and other European visitors to the West Coast of India in the sixteenth century, and the impression made upon them in this and other ways gave rise, at one remove, to the basic constitution of Thomas More’s Utopia. There is little about modern India that strikes one at once as Utopian: but the insistence upon the inculcation of norms, and the absence of bigotry and institutionalized exploitation of human or natural resources are two very different features which link the realities of India and her tradition with the essence of all Utopians. (June)

Question number: 5 (3 of 3 Based on Passage) Show Passage

» Reading Comprehension » Moderately Difficult Passages

Appeared in Year: 2014

MCQ▾

Question

What is the striking feature of modern India?

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

Adherence to traditional values

b.

Replica of Utopian State

c.

Absence of Bigotry

d.

Uniform Laws

Passage

I did that thing recently where you have to sign a big card - which is a horror unto itself, especially as the keeper of the Big Card was leaning over me at the time. Suddenly I was on the spot, a rabbit in the headlights, torn between doing a fun message or some sort of in-joke or a drawing. Instead overwhelmed by the myriad options available to me, I decide to just Write: “Good luck, best, Joel”.

It was then that I realized, to my horror, that I had forgotten how to write. My entire existence is “tap letters into computer”. My shopping lists are hidden in the notes function of my phone. If I need to remember something I send an e-mail to myself. A pen is something I chew when I’m struggling to think. Paper is something I pile beneath my laptop to make it a more comfortable height for me to type on.

A poll of 1, 000 teens by the stationers, Bic found that one in 10 don’t own a pen, a third have never written a letter, and half of 13 to 19 years - old have never been forced to sit down and write a thank you letter. More than 80 % have never written a love letter, 56 % don’t have letter paper at home. And a quarter have never known the unique torture of writing a birthday card. The most a teen ever has to use a pen is on an exam paper.

Bic, have you heard of mobile phone? Have you heard of e-mail, Facebook and snap chatting? This is the future. Pens are dead. Paper is dead. Handwriting is a relic.

“Handwriting is one of the most creative outlets we have and should be given the same importance as other art forms such as sketching, painting or photography. ”

Question number: 6 (1 of 4 Based on Passage) Show Passage

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MCQ▾

Question

The entire existence of the author revolves round

(1) Computer

(2) Mobile phone

(3) Typewriter

Identify the correct answer from the codes given below:

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

(2) and (3) only

b.

(1) and (2) only

c.

(2) only

d.

(1), (2) and (3)

Question number: 7 (2 of 4 Based on Passage) Show Passage

» Reading Comprehension » Moderately Difficult Passages

MCQ▾

Question

How many teens, as per the Bic survey, do not own a pen?

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

500

b.

100

c.

560

d.

800

Question number: 8 (3 of 4 Based on Passage) Show Passage

» Reading Comprehension » Moderately Difficult Passages

MCQ▾

Question

According to the author, which One is not the most creative outlet of pursuit?

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

Sketching

b.

Reading

c.

Handwriting

d.

Photography

Question number: 9 (4 of 4 Based on Passage) Show Passage

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MCQ▾

Question

When confronted with signing a big card, the author felt like “a rabbit in the headlight”. What does this phrase mean?

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

A state of confusion

b.

A state of pain

c.

A state of pleasure

d.

A state of anxiety

Passage

Read the following passage carefully and answer questions:

Many aspects of the motion-picture industry and its constituent companies are dissimilar to those observable in advanced-technology industries and firms. For instance, company longevity does not represent a consistent concern across the two organisational contexts. In the advanced-technology company for example, one new-product innovation – which is expected to generate financial returns to the firm- is insufficient for the company to be successful.

Rather, a stream of new product innovations is required, By contrast with the independent production company of this case, each new film – which is expected to generate financial returns to the principals – is sufficient for the company to be successful. Any subsequent new films involving the firm’s participants will be produced by a different independent company.

As another instance, people’s learning is expected to have different contributors and beneficiaries across the two organizational contexts. In the advanced-technology company, for example, each new product innovation provides an opportunity for participants on the project team to learn and acquire experience, and this same company intends to retain such participants, hence, benefit from their increased experience on the next project. By contrast with the independent production company, each new film provides an opportunity for participants on the project team to learn and acquire this experience also, but this same company has little or no expectation of retaining such participants, and hence, benefitting from their increased experience in the next project.

Experience is paramount in the motion-picture industry. Generally, on film projects, budgets are very tight, and schedules are very demanding. People are hired largely based on their experience and are expected to perform well immediately when called to do so. There is negligible slack time or margin for learning through trial and error, but experienced people learn exactly through trial and error. Because experience is valued so highly and film-production house have such short time horizons, entry into the industry is very difficult for most people. Further, the role played by school and colleges is minimal in this industry. Some skills and techniques can be learned and refined through formal education (e. g. , acting schools, theatre, film degree), but the majority come through direct experience. Mentoring plays an important role. True, the film business focuses heavily on exploitation over exploration. Yet success of the industry as a whole is critically dependent upon learning and exploration overtime.

Answer the following questions:

Question number: 10 (1 of 2 Based on Passage) Show Passage

» Reading Comprehension » Moderately Difficult Passages

MCQ▾

Question

What is not the expectation of an independent production company in the case of its participants?

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

Use of opportunity to acquire experience.

b.

Retention for the next project.

c.

Absence from the next project

d.

Participation in the current project.

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