Reading Comprehension (CBSE-NET (UGC) Paper-I): Questions 5 - 9 of 33

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Passage

Traditional Indian values must both be viewed from the angle of an individual and from that of a geographically delimited agglomeration of peoples or groups enjoying a common system of leadership which we call as “State”. Indian state’s special feature is peaceful, coexistence of social groups of various historical provenances which mutually adhere in geographical, economic and political sense, without ever assimilating to each other in social terms, in ways of thinking, or even in language. Modern Indian law will determine certain rules, especially in relation to the regime of the family, upon the basis of how the loin-cloth is tied, or how the turban is worn, for this may identify the litigants as members of a regional group, and therefore as participants in its traditional law, though their ancestors left the region three or four centuries earlier. The use of the word ‘State’ above must not mislead us. There was no such thing as a conflict between the individual and the State, atleast before foreign governments became established, just as there was no concept of state ‘sovereignty’ or of any church-and-state dichotomy.

Modem Indian ‘secularism’ has an admittedly peculiar feature: It requires the state to make a fair distribution of attention amongst all religions. These blessed aspects of India’s famed tolerance (Indian kings to rarely persecuted religious groups that the exceptions prove the rule) at once struck Portuguese and other European visitors to the West Coast of India in the sixteenth century, and the impression made upon them in this and other ways gave rise, at one remove, to the basic constitution of Thomas More’s Utopia. There is little about modern India that strikes one at once as Utopian: but the insistence upon the inculcation of norms, and the absence of bigotry and institutionalized exploitation of human or natural resources are two very different features which link the realities of India and her tradition with the essence of all Utopians. (June)

Question number: 5 (3 of 3 Based on Passage) Show Passage

» Reading Comprehension » Moderately Difficult Passages

Appeared in Year: 2014

MCQ▾

Question

What is the striking feature of modern India?

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

Adherence to traditional values

b.

Replica of Utopian State

c.

Absence of Bigotry

d.

Uniform Laws

Passage

Read the following passage carefully and answer questions:

The literary distaste for politics, however, seems to be focused not so much on the largely murky practice of politics in itself as a subject of literary representation but rather more on how it is often depicted in literature, i. e. , on the very politics of such representation. A political novel often turns out to be not merely a novel about politics but a novel with a politics of its own, for it seeks not merely to show us how things are but has fairly definite ideas about how things should be, and precisely what one should think and do in order to make things move in that desired direction. In short, it seeks to convert and enlist the reader to a particular cause or ideology; it often is (in an only too familiar phrase) not literature but propaganda. This is said to violate the very spirit of literature which is to broaden our understanding of the world and the range of our sympathies rather than to narrow them down through partisan commitment. As John Keats said, ‘We hate poetry that has a palpable design upon us’.

Another reason why politics does not seem amenable to the highest kind of literary representation seems to arise from the fact that politics by its very nature is constituted of ideas and ideologies. If political situations do not lend themselves to happy literary treatment, political ideas present perhaps an even greater problem in this regard. Literature, it is argued, is about human experiences rather than about intellectual abstractions; it deals in what is called the ‘felt reality’ of human flesh and blood, and in sap and savour (rasa) rather than in and lifeless ideas. In an extensive discussion of the matter in her book Ideas and the Novel, the American novelist Mary McCarthy observed that ‘ideas are still today felt to be unsightly in the novel’ though that was not so in ‘former days’, i. e. , in the 18th and 19th centuries. Her formulation of the precise nature of the incompatibility between ideas on the one hand and the novel on the other betrays perhaps a divided conscience in the matter and a sense of dilemma shared by many writers and readers: ‘An idea cannot have loose ends, but a novel, I almost think, needs them. Nevertheless, there is enough in common for the novelists to feel… the attraction of ideas while taking up arms against them most often with weapons of mockery. ’

Question number: 6 (1 of 7 Based on Passage) Show Passage

» Reading Comprehension » Advanced Passages

Appeared in Year: 2014

MCQ▾

Question

Given below is a diagram of three circles A, B and C over-lapping each other? The circle A represents the class of honest people, the circle B represent the class of sincere people and circle C represents the class of politicians. p, q, r, s, U, X, Y represent different regions. Select the code that represents the region indicating the class of honest politicians who are not sincere.

Picture showing Venn Diagram

Picture Showing Venn Diagram

Diagram represents honest people, sincere people and Politicians

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

p

b.

q

c.

X

d.

s

Question number: 7 (2 of 7 Based on Passage) Show Passage

» Reading Comprehension » Advanced Passages

Appeared in Year: 2014

MCQ▾

Question

The constructs of politics by its nature is (December)

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

Prevalent political situation

b.

Political propaganda

c.

Ideas and Ideologies

d.

Understanding of human nature

Question number: 8 (3 of 7 Based on Passage) Show Passage

» Reading Comprehension » Advanced Passages

Appeared in Year: 2014

MCQ▾

Question

Literature deals with (December)

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

Human experiences in politics

b.

Dry and empty ideas

c.

Intellectual abstractions

d.

Felt reality of human life

Question number: 9 (4 of 7 Based on Passage) Show Passage

» Reading Comprehension » Advanced Passages

Appeared in Year: 2014

MCQ▾

Question

According to the passage, a political novel often turns out to be a (December)

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

Literary representation of politics

b.

Novels with its own politics

c.

Depiction of murky practice of politics

d.

Literary distaste for politics

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