Climatology (CBSE-NET (UGC) Geography (Paper-II & Paper-III)): Questions 133 - 137 of 207

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Question number: 133

» Climatology » Temperature, Pressure and Winds

MCQ▾

Question

Mauna Loa, in Hawaii is famous for:

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

Monitoring sea level rise since 1950

b.

Monitoring rainfall

c.

Botanical garden

d.

Continuous monitoring of atmospheric CO2 since 1957

Question number: 134

» Climatology » Temperature, Pressure and Winds

Appeared in Year: 2015

MCQ▾

Question

Which two global winds originate from the subtropical highs? (June)

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

Chinook and Foehn

b.

Polar easterlies and westerlies

c.

Trade winds and westerlies

d.

Trade winds and polar easterlies

Question number: 135

» Climatology » Temperature, Pressure and Winds

MCQ▾

Question

An aircraft is flying at an altitude of 10 km. At that altitude the temperature is -400C. What is the ambient temperature on the ground?

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

250C

b.

30 0C

c.

240C

d.

200C

Question number: 136

» Climatology » Stability and Instability of the Atmosphere

Appeared in Year: 2015

MCQ▾

Question

Which of the following does not enhance the instability of air? (June)

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

intense solar heating in the lowermost atmosphere

b.

radiation cooling of earth’s surface after sun set

c.

radiation earth’s surface after sun set

d.

heating an air mass from below as it passes over a warm surface

Question number: 137

» Climatology » Temperature, Pressure and Winds

Appeared in Year: 2015

MCQ▾

Question

The only truely continuous pressure belt on the earth is (June)

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

Northern hemisphere subtropical high

b.

Southern hemisphere sub polar low

c.

Southern hemisphere subtropical high

d.

Equatorial low

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