Reading Comprehension [IAS (Admin.) IAS Mains Compulsory-English]: Questions 23 - 32 of 52

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Passage

Read carefully the passage below and write your answers to the questions that follow in clear, correct and concise language:

A complete reading program, therefore, should include four factors: at least one good book each week, a newspaper or news magazine, magazines of comment and interpretation, and book reviews. If you keep feeding your intelligence with these four foods, you can be sure that your brain cells will be properly nourished. To this must be added the digestive process that comes from your own thinking and from discussion with individuals or groups.

It is often desirable to make books that you own personally part of your mind by underlining or by marking in the margin the more important statements. This will help to understand the book as you first read it, because out of the mass of details you must have selected the essential ideas. It will help you to remember better the gist of the book, since the physical act of underlining, with your eyes on the page, tends to put the thought more firmly into your brain cells. It will save time whenever you need to refer to the book.

Above all, never forget that creative intelligence is correlation of facts and ideas, not more memorizing. What counts is what you can do with your knowledge, by linking it with other things you have studied or observed. If you read Plutarch’s life of Julius Caesar, think how his rise to political power paralleled the technique of Adolf Hitler, or that of your local political boss. If you read a play by Shakespeare, think how his portrayal of the characters helps you to understand someone you know. In everything you read, keep at the back of your mind what it means to your life and now, how it supports or challenges the things you were taught in school, in church and at home, and how the wisdom you get from books can guide you in your thinking, in your career, in your voting as a citizen and in your personal morals.

Question 23 (1 of 5 Based on Passage)

Reading Comprehension
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Appeared in Year: 2014

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What use can you put your knowledge to?

Question 24 (2 of 5 Based on Passage)

Reading Comprehension
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Appeared in Year: 2014

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How can what you learn from books help you in your life?

Question 25 (3 of 5 Based on Passage)

Reading Comprehension
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Appeared in Year: 2014

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Why does the writer recommend underlining or marking in the margin the more important statements?

Question 26 (4 of 5 Based on Passage)

Reading Comprehension
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Appeared in Year: 2014

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What are the four things required for a complete reading program and why?

Question 27 (5 of 5 Based on Passage)

Reading Comprehension
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Appeared in Year: 2014

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What else is required to feed your intelligence?

Passage

According to the findings of a recent government survey there are an estimated 3.3 million registered NGOs working in the country—one for every 400 Indians. Not only has the number of NGOs in India risen dramatically but so has their influence. In some of India’s flagship development efforts—the National Rural Employment Guarantee Act, the National Rural Health Mission, the Right to Education or even the draft Right to Food Act — NGOs have been at the forefront both in formulating these laws and policies and in implementing them. NGOs have helped voice the concerns of some of India’s most vulnerable groups and focus the attention of the government on critical, social and development issues. They have also spearheaded efforts to expose corruption and mal administration in government bringing in much needed transparency.

But despite the growing influence of NGOs in India today, we know very little about them: their structure, activities, sources of funding and, more importantly. How accountable they are to the people they represent. This is alarming given the crores of rupees in development aid that NGOs receive from the government and from donors every year. Ironically, though NGOs have been watchdogs of the government for many years, there has been little regulation or monitoring of their own activities. Leading many to ask a very fundamental question: who watches the watchers?

Interestingly, although India has probably the world’s highest NGO population, the debate on NGO accountability is still in its nascent stages. Across the world, NOOs have been experimenting with different ways of addressing the issue of accountability; Indian NGOs would do well by learning from these efforts. For example, NGOs in Kenya are legally required to comply with the Code of Conduct for NGOs developed by the National Council of NGOs, a self-regulatory body set up under the NGO Coordination Act in 1990. The code ensures that NGOs comply with basic ethical and governance standards. Similarly, in Uganda, the NGO Quality Assurance Mechanism (QuAM) certifies NGOs against a set of quality standards designed to ensure NGO credibility. In Chile, Chile Transparente has developed transparency standards for NGOs which require organisations to publish online information about their mission, vision, activities, staff details of funding etc.

Question 28 (1 of 5 Based on Passage)

Reading Comprehension
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Appeared in Year: 2010

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How do the NGOs in other nations deal with the issue of accountability?

Question 29 (2 of 5 Based on Passage)

Reading Comprehension
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Appeared in Year: 2010

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Whom does the author describe as watchers? Why?

Question 30 (3 of 5 Based on Passage)

Reading Comprehension
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Appeared in Year: 2010

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How do NGOs help ‘Vulnerable groups’ in India?

Question 31 (4 of 5 Based on Passage)

Reading Comprehension
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Appeared in Year: 2010

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What are India’s important development schemes?

Question 32 (5 of 5 Based on Passage)

Reading Comprehension
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Appeared in Year: 2010

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What do we know about the structure, activities and source of founding of the NGOs in India?