Multi-Genre Literatures in English [GATE (Graduate Aptitude Test in Engineering) English]: Questions 421 - 423 of 1304

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Question 421

Multi-Genre Literatures in English

Appeared in Year: 2012 (UGC)

Question

MCQ▾

Based on the following description, identify the text in reference:

This is a play in which no one comes, no one goes, nothing happens. In its opening scene a man struggles hard to remove his boot. The play was originally written in French, later translated into English. It was first performed in 1953. (June paper 3)

Choices

Choice (4)Response

a.

The Birthday Party

b.

Look Back in Anger

c.

The Zoo Story

d.

Waiting for Godot

Question 422

Multi-Genre Literatures in English

Appeared in Year: 2012 (UGC)

Question

Match List-Ⅰ List-Ⅱ▾

The following phrases from Shakespeare have become the titles of famous works. Identify the correctly matched group. (June paper 3)

List-Ⅰ (Column I)List-Ⅱ (Column II)
(A)

Under the Greenwood Tree

(i)

William Faulkner

(B)

Pale Fire

(ii)

Thomas Hardy

(C)

Of Cakes and Ale

(iii)

Somerset Maugham

(D)

The Sound and the Fury

(iv)

Vladimir Nabokov

(E)

Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead

(v)

Tom Stoppard

Choices

Choice (4)Response
  • (A)
  • (B)
  • (C)
  • (D)
  • (E)

a.

  • (i)
  • (v)
  • (iii)
  • (iv)
  • (ii)

b.

  • (ii)
  • (iv)
  • (iii)
  • (i)
  • (v)

c.

  • (iv)
  • (ii)
  • (v)
  • (i)
  • (iii)

d.

  • (ii)
  • (iv)
  • (v)
  • (iii)
  • (i)

Question 423

Multi-Genre Literatures in English

Appeared in Year: 2013 (UGC)

Question

MCQ▾

Identify the sonnet upon sonnet by William Wordsworth: (December Paper 3)

Choices

Choice (4)Response

a.

“London, 1802”

b.

“Nuns fret not at their convent՚s narrow room …”

c.

“Friend! I know not which way …”

d.

“The world is too much with us …”

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