Literary Criticism and Theory [GATE (Graduate Aptitude Test in Engineering) English]: Questions 68 - 71 of 208

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Question 68

Literary Criticism and Theory

Appeared in Year: 2012 (UGC)

Question

MCQ▾

Name the theorist who divided poets into “strong” and “weak” and popularized the practice of misreading:

Choices

Choice (4)Response

a.

Harold Bloom

b.

Alan Bloom

c.

Stanley Fish

d.

Geoffrey Hartman

Question 69

Literary Criticism and Theory

Appeared in Year: 2012 (UGC)

Question

MCQ▾

To refer to the unresolvable difficulties a text may open up, Derrida makes use of the term: (June)

Choices

Choice (4)Response

a.

Aporia

b.

Difference

c.

Supplement

d.

Erasure

Question 70

Literary Criticism and Theory

Appeared in Year: 2012 (UGC)

Question

Match List-Ⅰ List-Ⅱ▾

Match the followings (June)

List-Ⅰ (Column I)List-Ⅱ (Column II)
(A)

Literary criticism is a description and evaluation of its object

(i)

Brooks, “The Formalist Critic”

(B)

Good sense is the body of poetic genius

(ii)

Sidney, Defence/An Apology for Poetry

(C)

Poetry is the breath and a finer spirit of all knowledge.

(iii)

Coleridge, Biographia Literaria

(D)

Nature never set forth the earth in as rich a tapestry as diverse poets have done

(iv)

Wordsworth, Preface to Lyrical Ballads

Choices

Choice (4)Response
  • (A)
  • (B)
  • (C)
  • (D)

a.

  • (iv)
  • (ii)
  • (iii)
  • (i)

b.

  • (i)
  • (iii)
  • (iv)
  • (ii)

c.

  • (ii)
  • (i)
  • (iii)
  • (iv)

d.

  • (ii)
  • (iii)
  • (iv)
  • (i)

Question 71

Literary Criticism and Theory

Appeared in Year: 2013 (UGC)

Question

MCQ▾

I have known three generations of John Smiths. The type breeds true. John Smith II and III went to the same school, university and learned profession as John Smith I. Yet John Smith I wrote pseudo-Swinburne; John Smith II wrote pseudo-Brooke; and John Smith III is now writing pseudo-Eliot. But unless John Smith can write John Smith, however unfashionable the result, why does he bother to write at all? Surely one Swinburne; one Brooke, and one Eliot are enough in any age? (Robert Graves, “The Poet and his Public” )

  1. Graves is critical of blind adulation and imitation of successful poets.
  2. Graves is critical of blind conformity to standards set by Swinburne, Brooke, and Eliot.
  3. Swinburne, Brooke, and Eliot represent the movements: Decadence, the Georgian, and Modernist respectively.
  4. The poets in question are Algernon Charles Swinburne, Stopford Brooke, and Thomas Stearns Eliot. (December Paper 3)

Choices

Choice (4)Response

a.

Only 3 is incorrect.

b.

Only 1 and 2 are correct.

c.

Only 4 is incorrect.

d.

Only 3 and 4 are correct.

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