GATE (Graduate Aptitude Test in Engineering) English: Questions 1374 - 1376 of 1960

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Question 1374

Appeared in Year: 2010 (UGC)

Question

MCQ▾

The literary prize, Booker of Bookers, was awarded to (June Paper-II)

Choices

Choice (4)Response

a.

J. M. Coetzee

b.

Nadine Gordimer

c.

Salman Rushdie

d.

Martin Amis

Question 1375

Appeared in Year: 2010 (UGC)

Question

MCQ▾

Charles Darwin՚s Origin of the Species was published in the year (December Paper-II)

Choices

Choice (4)Response

a.

1859

b.

1879

c.

1845

d.

1866

Question 1376

Appeared in Year: 2018 (UGC)

Question

MCQ▾

Thou wilt not wake

Till I thy fate shall overtake;

Till age, or grief, or sickness must

Marry my body to that dust

It so much loves; and fill the room

My heart keeps empty in thy Tomb.

Stay for me there; I will not fail

To meet thee in that hollow Vale.

And think not much of my delay;

I am already on the way.

Which of the following readings do you find appropriate to the spirit of the lines above? (July Paper-2)

Choices

Choice (4)Response

a.

My whole nature was so penetrated with grief and humiliation of such considerations, that, even now, famous and caressed and happy as I am, I often forget in my dream that I have a dear wife who died, leaving me alone in this world. Even that I am a man, and now I wander desolately back to that time of our lives when my wife and I shared moments of bliss.

b.

Ageing and dying are of course helplessly passive; but here love makes them asthough they were now also willing things in the husband eager to join his deadwife. Through simple intimate tones of their shared earthly life - stay for me, wait for me, I will not fail - he not only imagines her but imagines her thinking of him.

c.

In that interspace between the lines, the ending of one and the beginning of another, there is a silent internal language, the poem՚s language-within-language, tacitly signaled through the deployment of rhymed space.

d.

The lyric voice here can feel the poem speaking back to him - in the cold lineal stare of ‘there was nothing in my belief’ - even as his dead wife did not. It is as though the poem itself then demands his response, in order to be able to move from one line to another. To attempt that movement in keeping the poem՚s space alive, the lyricvoice asserts, “I will not fail/To meet there in that hollow Vale.”

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