GATE (Graduate Aptitude Test in Engineering) English: Questions 1247 - 1251 of 1960

Access detailed explanations (illustrated with images and videos) to 1960 questions. Access all new questions- tracking exam pattern and syllabus. View the complete topic-wise distribution of questions. Unlimited Access, Unlimited Time, on Unlimited Devices!

View Sample Explanation or View Features.

Rs. 550.00 -OR-

How to register? Already Subscribed?

Question 1247

Appeared in Year: 2017 (UGC)

Question

MCQ▾

Which of the following landscapes of England figures prominently in the poetry of Ted Hughes? (November Paper 3)

Choices

Choice (4)Response

a.

Yorkshire moors

b.

Cornish cliffs

c.

Dorset moors

d.

Chesil Beach

Passage

Read the below passage and answer questions

THE ANTIGUA THAT I knew, the Antigua in which I grew up, is not the Antigua you, a tourist, would see now. That Antigua no longer exists. That Antigua no longer exists partly for the usual reason, the passing of time, and partly because the bad-minded people who used to rule over it, the English, no longer do so. (But the English have become such a pitiful lot these days, with hardly any idea what to do with themselves now that they no longer have one quarter of the earth՚s human population bowing and scraping before them. They don՚t seem to know that this empire business was all wrong and they should, at least, be wearing sackcloth and ashes in token penance of the wrongs committed, the irrevocableness of their bad deeds, for no natural disaster imaginable could equal the harm they did. Actual death might have been better. And so all this fuss over empire – what went wrong here, what went wrong there – always makes me quite crazy, for I can say to them what went wrong: they should never have left their home, their precious England, a place they loved so much, a place they had to leave but could never forget. And so everywhere they went they turned it into England; and everybody they met they turned English. But no place could ever really be England, and nobody who did not look exactly like them would ever be English, so you can imagine the destruction of people and land that came from that. The English hate each other and they hate England, and the reason they are so miserable now is that they have no place else to go and nobody else to feel better than.) (December Paper III)

Question 1248 (1 of 4 Based on Passage)

Appeared in Year: 2015 (UGC)

Question

MCQ▾

To whom is the passage directly addressed?

Choices

Choice (4)Response

a.

Readers

b.

The English

c.

Tourists

d.

Non-antiguans

Question 1249 (2 of 4 Based on Passage)

Appeared in Year: 2015 (UGC)

Question

MCQ▾

The English feel extremely miserable because:

Choices

Choice (4)Response

a.

Their political supremacy is over

b.

They have no lands to colonise

c.

They do not have anyone else to feel superior to

d.

They have been reduced to a state of non-entity

Question 1250 (3 of 4 Based on Passage)

Appeared in Year: 2015 (UGC)

Question

MCQ▾

Do the British realize that colonizing countries was a bad practice, according to the narrator?

Choices

Choice (4)Response

a.

The narrator is rather unsure they don՚t

b.

No; they don՚t

c.

Yes; they do

d.

The narrator is rather unsure they do

Question 1251 (4 of 4 Based on Passage)

Appeared in Year: 2015 (UGC)

Question

MCQ▾

Which of the following best describes the content of the extract?

Choices

Choice (4)Response

a.

The speaker whose childhood was spent in Antigua reports the great change currently evident in the pungent irony

b.

The speaker fervently desires better understanding between the English and the colonized people in post colonial times

c.

The speaker is making a case for the penance of the English, the erstwhile rulers of Antigua.

d.

The speaker is interested in nostalgic tours of emigre antiguans to their childhood home

Developed by: