GATE (Graduate Aptitude Test in Engineering) Computer Science: Questions 366 - 368 of 2080

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Question 366

Appeared in Year: 2015 (UGC-NET)

Question

MCQ▾

Suppose ORACLE relation R (A, B) currently has tuples { (1,2) , (1,3) , (3,4) } and relation S (B, C) currently has { (2,5) , (4,6) , (7,8) } . Consider the following two SQL queries SQ1 and SQ2:

  1. SQ1:Select ⚹
  2. FromRFullJoinS
  3. OnR.B=S.B;
  4. SQ2:Select ⚹
  5. FromRInnerJoinS
  6. OnR.B=S.B;

The numbers of tuples in the result of the SQL query SQ1 and the SQL query SQ2 are given by: (December)

Choices

Choice (4)Response

a.

2 and 6 respectively

b.

2 and 4 respectively

c.

4 and 2 respectively

d.

6 and 2 respectively

Question 367

Appeared in Year: 2015 (UGC-NET)

Question

MCQ▾

A horn clause is … (December)

Choices

Choice (4)Response

a.

A disjunction of a number of literals

b.

A clause that has at most one positive literal.

c.

A clause in which no variables occur in the expression

d.

A clause that has at least one negative literal

Question 368

Appeared in Year: 2016 (UGC-NET)

Question

MCQ▾

Given the following statements:

(1) Frequency Division Multiplexing is a technique that can be applied when the bandwidth of a link is greater than combined bandwidth of signals to be transmitted.

(2) Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) is an analog multiplexing Technique to combine optical signals.

(3) WDM is a Digital Multiplexing Technique.

(4) TDM is a Digital Multiplexing Technique.

Which of the following is correct?

Choices

Choice (4)Response

a.

(1) , (2) and (4) are true; (3) is false.

b.

(1) , (2) , (3) and (4) are false.

c.

(1) , (2) , (3) and (4) are true.

d.

(1) , (2) and (4) are false; (3) is true.

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