Reading Comprehension-Poetry (CTET Paper-I English): Questions 78 - 84 of 124

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Passage

Nostalgically recollecting fond memories, the poet looks at a very old photograph of her mother who has been dead for nearly twelve years. The poet is consumed with grief but is left with no words to express the loss.

The poem begins with the poet looking at a very old photograph of her mother at twelve years of age. The photograph, on a cardboard frame, shows the poet’s mother, with her two girl cousins each holding one of her hand. She was eldest of the three and had a ‘sweet face’. In the snapshot, all the three girls stand still, smiling with their hair falling on their faces, to get clicked by the camera of their uncle, on an occasion when they went paddling. The sea, which has apparently undergone no change, washed their ‘transient’ feet. This image of transcience provides a sharp contrast to the eternal sea.

Some twenty or thirty years later, the poet’s mother laughed at the picture pointing how she was looking. Betty and Dolly (the two cousins) were made to dress for the beach holiday.

That sea holiday was a thing of past for her mother at that time, while her mother’s laughter is the poet’s past now. Both signify their respective losses and the pain involved in recollecting the past.

Her mother is dead for nearly twelve years now. And for the present ‘circumstance’ the poet has nothing left to say. She is absorbed in the memories of her dead mother. The painful ‘silence’ of the situation leaves the poet silent, with no words to express her grief. Thus, the ‘silence silences’ her.

–Shirley Toulson

Question number: 78 (2 of 6 Based on Passage) Show Passage

» Reading Comprehension » Poetry

MCQ▾

Question

What does, ‘circumstance’ refer to -

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

cheerful days of childhood

b.

speechless situation

c.

prominent features

d.

death of poetess mother

Question number: 79 (3 of 6 Based on Passage) Show Passage

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MCQ▾

Question

What has the camera captured?

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

Crab and Shells

b.

The three girls

c.

Beaches

d.

Betty and Dolly

Question number: 80 (4 of 6 Based on Passage) Show Passage

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MCQ▾

Question

What has not changed over the years? According to the poem.

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

The beach

b.

The external sea

c.

The photograph of poetess mother

d.

Nature of poetess

Question number: 81 (5 of 6 Based on Passage) Show Passage

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MCQ▾

Question

The poetess says that after a gap of almost …. , she sees her mother snapshot.

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

20 years

b.

20 - 30 years

c.

12 years

d.

15 - 20 years

Question number: 82 (6 of 6 Based on Passage) Show Passage

» Reading Comprehension » Poetry

MCQ▾

Question

What does the word ‘cardboard’ denotes in the poem?

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

Photographs is probably stuck on a cardboard

b.

The cardboard is just a non-breathing piece

c.

It is a board made of wooden

d.

The lively presence of poetess’ mother

Passage

Behold her, single in the filed,

Yon solitary Highland Lass!

Reaping and singing by herself;

Stop here, or gently pass!

Along she cuts and binds the grain,

And sings a melancholy strain;

O listen! for the Vale profound

Is overflowing with the sound.

No Nightingale did ever chaunt

More welcome notes to weary bands

Of travellers in some shady haunt,

Among Arabian sands:

A voice so thrilling ne’er was heard

In spring time from the Cuckoo-bird,

Breaking the silence of the seas

Among the farthest Hebrides.

Will no one tell me what she sings?

Perhaps the plaintive numbers flow

For old, unhappy, far-off things

And battles long ago:

Or is it some more humble lay,

Familiar matter of to-day?

Some natural sorrow, loss, or plain,

That has been, and may be again?

Whate’er the theme, the Maiden sang

As if her song could have no ending

I saw her singing at her work,

And o’er the sickle bending;

I listenend, motionless and still,

And, as I mounted up the hill, ‘

The music in my heart I bore, ‘

Long after it was heart no more.

- William Wordsworth

Question number: 83 (1 of 6 Based on Passage) Show Passage

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MCQ▾

Question

The poet’s lament in the poem ‘The Solitary Reaper’s is that-

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

he did not know the lass

b.

she stopped singing at once

c.

he cannot understand the song

d.

he had to move away

Question number: 84 (2 of 6 Based on Passage) Show Passage

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MCQ▾

Question

The setting of the poem is in -

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

Arabia

b.

England

c.

Scotland

d.

Hebrides

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