Reading Comprehension (CTET Paper-I English): Questions 137 - 143 of 294

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Passage

The nightingale, that all day long

Had cheered the village with his song

Not yet at eve his note suspended,

Nor yet when eventide was ended,

Began to feel, as well he might,

The keen demands of appetite;

When, looking eagerly around,

He spied far off, upon the ground

A something shining in the dark,

And knew the glow worm by his spark;

So, stooping down from hawthorn top,

He thought to put him in his crop

The worm, aware of his intent,

Harangued him thus, right eloquent

‘Did you admire my lamp, ’ quoth he,

‘As much as I your minstrelsy,

You would abhor to do me wrong,

As much as I to spoil your song;

For’twas the self same power divine,

Taught you to sing, and me to shine;

That you with music, I with light,

Might beautify and cheer the night;

The songster heart his short oration

And warbling out his approbation,

Released him as my story tells,

And found a supper somewhere else.

– William Couper

Question number: 137 (5 of 6 Based on Passage) Show Passage

» Reading Comprehension » Poetry

MCQ▾

Question

Explain, ‘The keen demands of appetite’.

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

He thought he could not fulfill his appetite

b.

The nightingale was now hungry

c.

Good appetite is important for singing

d.

He had a very large appetite

Question number: 138 (6 of 6 Based on Passage) Show Passage

» Reading Comprehension » Poetry

MCQ▾

Question

Suggest a suitable topic for the poem.

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

The Nightingale and the Glowworm

b.

The Nightingale’s Tragedy

c.

Power of Divine

d.

Song Versus Light

Passage

It is to progress in the Human Sciences that we must look to undo the evils, which have resulted from a knowledge of the physical world hastily and superficially acquired by populations unconscious of the changes in themselves that the new knowledge has made imperative. The road to a happier world than any known in the past lies open before us if atavistic destructive passions can be kept in leash while the necessary adaptations are made. Fears are inevitable in our time, but hopes are equally rational and far more likely to bear good fruit. We must learn to think rather less of the dangers to be avoided than of the good that will lie within our grasp if we can believe in it and let it dominate our thoughts. Science, whatever unpleasant consequences it may have by the way, is in its very nature a liberator, a liberator of bondage to physical nature and in to come, a liberator from the weight of destructive passions. We are on the threshold of utter disaster or unprecedentedly glorious achievement. No previous age has been fraught with problems, so momentous and it is to Science that we must look to for a happy future.

Question number: 139 (1 of 9 Based on Passage) Show Passage

» Reading Comprehension » Prose or Drama

MCQ▾

Question

The word ‘imperative’ means

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

trivial

b.

threatening

c.

vital

d.

None of the above

Question number: 140 (2 of 9 Based on Passage) Show Passage

» Reading Comprehension » Prose or Drama

MCQ▾

Question

What does Science liberate us from? It liberates us from-

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

bondage to physical nature

b.

idealistic hopes of a glorious future

c.

fears and destructive passions

d.

slavery to physical nature and from passions

Question number: 141 (3 of 9 Based on Passage) Show Passage

» Reading Comprehension » Prose or Drama

MCQ▾

Question

Fears and hopes, according to the author-

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

are closely linked with the life of modern man

b.

can bear fruit

c.

can yield good results

d.

are irrational

Question number: 142 (4 of 9 Based on Passage) Show Passage

» Reading Comprehension » Prose or Drama

MCQ▾

Question

To carve out a bright future a man should-

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

overcome fears and dangers

b.

analyse dangers that lie ahead

c.

try to avoid dangers

d.

cultivate a positive outlook

Question number: 143 (5 of 9 Based on Passage) Show Passage

» Reading Comprehension » Prose or Drama

MCQ▾

Question

Choose the word opposite in meaning to the word ‘superficially’

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

thoroughly

b.

legally

c.

primarily

d.

gradually

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