Reading Comprehension (CTET Paper-I English): Questions 129 - 135 of 294

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Passage

Human Nature

Is it human nature

to desire forbidden fruit,

to hunger for a blossom

so obsessed with passion

that we forget the pain,

which inevitably arises

once we tease ourselves

with the thought of it

or taste a tiny part of it,

and it becomes the predator

eating at us like a carnivore

that saves the head for last

savouring the brain to feed its own

and we, still craving illicit nectar

enjoying the fact that it is devouring us?

Question number: 129 (3 of 6 Based on Passage) Show Passage

» Reading Comprehension » Poetry

MCQ▾

Question

“It becomes the predator” means-

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

being strong and positive against any threat

b.

being cautions against outside influences

c.

pursuit of happiness

d.

strong emotions influence us negatively

Question number: 130 (4 of 6 Based on Passage) Show Passage

» Reading Comprehension » Poetry

MCQ▾

Question

“Eating at us like a carnivore” refers to-

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

being attacked by a human enemy

b.

being attacked by a wild beast

c.

being eaten up by an unknown entity

d.

exerting a strong influence

Question number: 131 (5 of 6 Based on Passage) Show Passage

» Reading Comprehension » Poetry

MCQ▾

Question

Another word in the poem that suggests ‘forbidden’ is -

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

savour

b.

illicit

c.

obsess

d.

crave

Question number: 132 (6 of 6 Based on Passage) Show Passage

» Reading Comprehension » Poetry

MCQ▾

Question

A synonym for the word ‘savouring’ is -

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

experiencing

b.

smelling

c.

avoiding

d.

flavouring

Passage

The nightingale, that all day long

Had cheered the village with his song

Not yet at eve his note suspended,

Nor yet when eventide was ended,

Began to feel, as well he might,

The keen demands of appetite;

When, looking eagerly around,

He spied far off, upon the ground

A something shining in the dark,

And knew the glow worm by his spark;

So, stooping down from hawthorn top,

He thought to put him in his crop

The worm, aware of his intent,

Harangued him thus, right eloquent

‘Did you admire my lamp, ’ quoth he,

‘As much as I your minstrelsy,

You would abhor to do me wrong,

As much as I to spoil your song;

For’twas the self same power divine,

Taught you to sing, and me to shine;

That you with music, I with light,

Might beautify and cheer the night;

The songster heart his short oration

And warbling out his approbation,

Released him as my story tells,

And found a supper somewhere else.

– William Couper

Question number: 133 (1 of 6 Based on Passage) Show Passage

» Reading Comprehension » Poetry

MCQ▾

Question

Suggest a suitable topic for the poem.

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

The Nightingale and the Glowworm

b.

The Nightingale’s Tragedy

c.

Power of Divine

d.

Song Versus Light

Question number: 134 (2 of 6 Based on Passage) Show Passage

» Reading Comprehension » Poetry

MCQ▾

Question

Explain, ‘The keen demands of appetite’.

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

He thought he could not fulfill his appetite

b.

The nightingale was now hungry

c.

Good appetite is important for singing

d.

He had a very large appetite

Question number: 135 (3 of 6 Based on Passage) Show Passage

» Reading Comprehension » Poetry

MCQ▾

Question

What did the nightingale finally decide?

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

To keep singing for the whole night

b.

To make the glowworm his supper

c.

To sit and wait for something else

d.

To find his supper somewhere else

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