CTET Paper-I English: Questions 194 - 201 of 294

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Passage

Behold her, single in the filed,

Yon solitary Highland Lass!

Reaping and singing by herself;

Stop here, or gently pass!

Along she cuts and binds the grain,

And sings a melancholy strain;

O listen! for the Vale profound

Is overflowing with the sound.

No Nightingale did ever chaunt

More welcome notes to weary bands

Of travellers in some shady haunt,

Among Arabian sands:

A voice so thrilling ne’er was heard

In spring time from the Cuckoo-bird,

Breaking the silence of the seas

Among the farthest Hebrides.

Will no one tell me what she sings?

Perhaps the plaintive numbers flow

For old, unhappy, far-off things

And battles long ago:

Or is it some more humble lay,

Familiar matter of to-day?

Some natural sorrow, loss, or plain,

That has been, and may be again?

Whate’er the theme, the Maiden sang

As if her song could have no ending

I saw her singing at her work,

And o’er the sickle bending;

I listenend, motionless and still,

And, as I mounted up the hill, ‘

The music in my heart I bore, ‘

Long after it was heart no more.

- William Wordsworth

Question number: 194 (6 of 6 Based on Passage) Show Passage

» Reading Comprehension » Poetry

MCQ▾

Question

The setting of the poem is in -

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

Arabia

b.

England

c.

Scotland

d.

Hebrides

Passage

This child is built to my design

Yet what he loves I cannot share,

Silence surrounds us. I would have

Him prodigal, returning to

His father’s house, the home he knew,

Rather than see him make and move

His world. I would forgive his too,

Shaping from sorrow a new love.

Father and son, we both must live

On the same globe and the same land.

He speaks: I cannot understand

Myself, why anger grows from grief.

We each put out an empty hand.

Longing for something to forgive.

Elizabeth Jennings

Question number: 195 (1 of 6 Based on Passage) Show Passage

» Reading Comprehension » Poetry

MCQ▾

Question

The father helplessness is brought out very -

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

commonly

b.

seriously

c.

poignantly

d.

differently

Question number: 196 (2 of 6 Based on Passage) Show Passage

» Reading Comprehension » Poetry

MCQ▾

Question

This poem deals with -

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

extravagent of son

b.

comfortable relationship

c.

caring for elderly

d.

general issue of generation gap

Question number: 197 (3 of 6 Based on Passage) Show Passage

» Reading Comprehension » Poetry

MCQ▾

Question

The rhyme scheme is -

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

abcdef faebdc

b.

aaba

c.

a b b a b a

d.

Question does not provide sufficient data or is vague

Question number: 198 (4 of 6 Based on Passage) Show Passage

» Reading Comprehension » Poetry

MCQ▾

Question

Identify the phrase or line that indicates distance between father and son.

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

Silence surrounds us

b.

Shaping from sorrow a newlove

c.

In the same house for years

d.

On the same globe and the same land

Question number: 199 (5 of 6 Based on Passage) Show Passage

» Reading Comprehension » Poetry

MCQ▾

Question

What is the name of the poem from which these lines have been extracted?

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

Father to son

b.

Son to Father

c.

Son of Mother

d.

Son and Father

Question number: 200 (6 of 6 Based on Passage) Show Passage

» Reading Comprehension » Poetry

MCQ▾

Question

This poem seems to be a -

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

Subjective

b.

Non - Subjective

c.

Personal

d.

memory of childhood

Passage

All the world’s a stage,

And all the men and women merely players;

They have their exits and their entrances,

And one man in his time plays many parts.

His acts being seven ages. At first the infant,

Mewling and puking in the nurse’s arms;

And then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel

And shining morning face, creeping like snail

Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,

Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad,

Made to his mistress’ eyebrow. Then, a soldier,

Full of strange oaths, and bearded like the pard,

Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in quarrel,

Seeking the bubble reputation

Even in the cannon’s mouth. And then the justice,

In fair round belly with good capon lined,

With eyes severe and beard of formal cut,

Full of wise saws and modern instances;

And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts

Into the learn and slippered pantaloon,

With spectacles on nose and pouch on side;

His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide

For his shrunk shank: and his big manly voice,

Turning again toward childish treble, pipes

And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,

That ends this strange eventful history,

Is second childishness and mere oblivion,

Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.

– William Shakespeare

Question number: 201 (1 of 6 Based on Passage) Show Passage

» Reading Comprehension » Poetry

MCQ▾

Question

The line ‘Creeping like snail unwilling to go to school’ contains the poetic device -

Choices

Choice (4) Response

a.

Metaphor

b.

Simile

c.

Personification

d.

Hyperbole

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