Child Development (Primary School Child) (CTET (Central Teacher Eligibility Test) Paper-I Child Development & Pedagogy): Questions 51 - 54 of 147

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Question number: 51

» Child Development (Primary School Child) » Piaget, Kohlberg and Vygotsky's Perspectives

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Appeared in Year: 2011

MCQ▾

Question

According to Piaget, at which of the following stages does a child begin to think logically about abstract propositions? - (June) ‘

Choices

Choice (4)Response

a.

Formal operational stage (11 years and up)

b.

Sensori-motor stage (Birth – 02 years)

c.

Concrete operational stage (07 – 11 years)

d.

Pre-operational stage (02 – 07 years)

Question number: 52

» Child Development (Primary School Child) » Development and Learning

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Appeared in Year: 2011

MCQ▾

Question

”Development is a never ending process. ” This idea is associated with – (June)

Choices

Choice (4)Response

a.

Principle of integration

b.

Principle of continuity

c.

Principle of interaction

d.

Principle of interrelation

Question number: 53

» Child Development (Primary School Child) » Piaget, Kohlberg and Vygotsky's Perspectives

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Appeared in Year: 2011

MCQ▾

Question

Four distinct stages of children’s intellectual development are identified by – (June)

Choices

Choice (4)Response

a.

Erikson

b.

Piaget

c.

Skinner

d.

Kohlberg

Question number: 54

» Child Development (Primary School Child) » Construct of Intelligence

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Appeared in Year: 2011

MCQ▾

Question

Which of the following is not a sign of an intelligent young child? – (June)

Choices

Choice (4)Response

a.

One who has the ability to communicate fluently and appropriately

b.

One who can adjust oneself in a new environment

c.

One who carries on thinking in an abstract manner

d.

One who has the ability to cram long essays very quickly

Developed by: