Sensation & Perception (AP Psychology): Questions 100 - 103 of 180

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Question number: 100

» Sensation & Perception » Perceptual Processes » Interpretation

MCQ▾

Question

Perception is a process by which

Choices

Choice (4) Response
a.

sensations are assembled into meaningful patterns that represent external events.

b.

environmental stimuli are sensed.

c.

sensations and experiences are stored permanently in the brain.

d.

many different forms of stimulus energy are converted into electrical signals for use by the nervous system.

Question number: 101

» Sensation & Perception » Perceptual Processes » Organization

MCQ▾

Question

The stimuli below are organized as three columns rather than six columns because of the organizational principle of

XX XX XX

XX XX XX

XX XX XX

XX XX XX

XX XX XX

Choices

Choice (4) Response
a.

nearness.

b.

simplicity.

c.

continuity.

d.

similarity.

Question number: 102

» Sensation & Perception » Sensory Mechanics

MCQ▾

Question

Synaesthesia refers to

Choices

Choice (4) Response
a.

seeing the color green after staring at the color red.

b.

seeing red color after starting at color green.

c.

one sense inducing an experience in another sense.

d.

the frequency and pitch of sound waves.

Question number: 103

» Sensation & Perception » Perceptual Processes » Extrasensory Perception

MCQ▾

Question

A major criticism of ESP research is that

Choices

Choice (4) Response
a.

if the experimenter really believes in ESP, he or she is much more likely to interpret coincidence as cause-and-effect.

b.

researchers have been unwilling to investigate psychic phenomena in laboratory settings.

c.

parapsychological skills are too consistent to be real.

d.

if the experimenter really believes in ESP, he or she is less likely to interpret coincidence as cause-and-effect.

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